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ICON WORKSHOP  2013

Fr Mefodii
Fr Mefodii
Fr Mefodii
ICON WORKSHOP 2013

iCON WORKSHOP - PROSOPON SCHOOL OF ICONOLOGY

Instructor   Father Mefodii, Master Iconographer, Prosopon School
 
Dates:        June 24-29 2013. Meeting daily Monday through Saturday, 9am - 4pm (approximately),
                   except Monday we meet at 8:30 to complete registration.
    
Prosopon School:  The traditional Byzantine-Russian icon-writing method of the Prosopon School of Iconology, founded by Vladislav Andreyev, is a revival of the iconography style of Andre Rublev (15th-16th century). The Prosopon School emphasizes the spiritual aspects of the multi-step process of  writing the icon. To view  icons in the Prosopon style, please see: www.prosoponschool.org.

Students will work on an icon during the workshop using ancient techniques of painting and  floating with egg tempera and natural materials: carved wooden boards, pure gold leaf, and finely ground clay and mineral pigments mixed with egg yolk. Fr. Mefodii will emphasize the underlying theology of the icon  as we work during the week.

Previous “artistic” experience is not necessary since icon writing is as much a contemplative form of prayer as an ascetic discipline and uses the traditional “floating” technique. The  workshop will consist of six full-day sessions during which each student will complete an icon.   The  students will receive step-by-step instructions and all necessary  materials to paint/write the icon.  Beginning students will work on the icon of  Archangel Michael.  Students returning for the second year may work on the icon of Archangel Gabriel.  Students who have attended previous workshops will be assigned an icon appropriate to their experience. This year Fr. Mefodii has selected the icon of the Archangel Raphael with Tobias for advanced students which is shown in the book Prosopon School Icons, p 165, or they can contact Fr. Mefodii in advance to discuss options.

Instructor Father Mefodii, Master Iconographer and student of Vladislav Andreyev since 1991; was appointed instructor in 2006; promoted to Master iconographer 2008; he has conducted workshops throughout the US and in England. He is an Orthodox priest-monk  (Hieromonk) of the Skete of St. Maximos the Confessor in Palmyra, VA.

Total Cost: $585 ($595 for advanced students) which includes tuition for the class, icon board plus materials fee for gold leaf. The non-refundable deposit of $100 (to be included in total cost) is required no later than June 14, 2013 but please register early to reserve your place!

Students are responsible for their own meals and lodging.  Students may bring their own lunch or group order from local sandwich shop. There are several nearby hotels. We suggest checking online – any lodging property on Cerrillos Road  or Saint Francis Drive will put you on main streets that are easy to navigate to Saint Anne School and elsewhere in Santa Fe.  Please call workshop coordinator Elizabeth if you have questions.

Location:    Saint Anne School on Alicia Street (between Hickox and Agua Fria) Santa Fe, NM  
                   Contact is NOT at Saint Anne. .  
                   Please contact Elizabeth, Workshop Coordinator  505-660-9113 or  ebezzerides@gmail.com    

Mailing address: Saint Dimitri Orthodox Church  - 2270 - 39th Street - Los Alamos, NM 87544

PAST WORKSHOP - ICON WORKSHOP 2012

Fr Mefodii, Instructor
Fr Mefodii, Instructor
Fr Mefodii, Instructor
PAST WORKSHOPS - 2012

Icon Workshop - instructor Father Mefodii - from the Prosopon School of Iconology.

July 9 to 14, 2012  Held in Santa Fe, New Mexico

Six-day intensive workshop - theory and practice

Beginner and intermediate students - (beginner:  no previous art experience required)
(advanced students may contact earlier to discuss with instructor icon appropriate for them)

Call Elizabeth at 505-660-9113 for additional information.

Icon Workshop 2010

 
Icon Workshop Location

Direction to Icon Workshop

The Icon Workshop will be held at Saint Anne's Parish in Santa Fe located at the corner of Hickox and Alicia Streets.

Please call co-ordinator Elizabeth for additional information. (505-660-9113)
Icon Painting Workshop

Icon of Guardian Angel
Icon of Guardian Angel
Icon of Guardian Angel
Icon of Archangel Michael (Beginning student)
Icon of Archangel Michael (Beginning student)
Icon of Archangel Michael (Beginning student)
Icon Painting Workshop

Saint Dimitri Orthodox Church co-ordinates an Icon Painting Workshop of the Prosopon School of Iconology (www.prosoponschool.com). This year the workshop will be held from June 21 -26.   The course involves the study of the ancient techniques and painting an icon in the ancient Byzantine-Russian tradition which reached its heights in the XV-XVI centuries. The Prosopon School of Iconlogy was founded by Vladislav Andrejev who learned this ancient art while still in Russia during the Soviet era. The School is based in New York State and conducts workshops throughout US and Canada.

Students learn the floating techinique of icon painting using eye tempura and natural pirgments. Each step of the many layered process has a symbolic and liturgical basis which is taught in parallel to the painting technique. Other techniques include gilding on bole(clay) and sealing with the final olipha application.

The icon shown on the left is typical of a second or third year student. The icon on the right is a beginning student's icon of the Archangel Michael from the first workshop attended by the student.

Note: a background in art is NOT required to be successful in this course.

The workshop hours are 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m (with one-hour lunch break).

Contact Elizabeth at 505-660-9113 or e-mail: ebezzsolo@juno.com for additional information.

Icons in the Orthodox Church

Perhaps the first thing that a visitor might notice upon entering an Orthodox church is the abundance of artistic painted images called icons. The visitor will see a partition composed of icons and ornament separating the altar from the nave; he will observe individual icons painted on wooden panels resting on stands; he will note that the walls are covered with paintings of various scenes and personages and that even the ceiling and the adjoining vestibule and side-rooms of the church have iconic images. What are these painting-like images, and what is their meaning and function within the Church?

The word icon simply means "image" in the Greek language. Icons are images of Jesus Christ, the Virgin Mary, angels, saints, and important New and Old Testament events in the history of Christianity which involve these holy persons. Oil lamps are lit in front of the icons, and the faithful make the sign of the cross, bow down before, and venerate them with a kiss. Afterwards, they place candles on the candle stands before the icons. The subject of the icon or icons displayed on the stand in the center of the church depends on the specific Feast or Saint celebrated during that time. Icons are carried by the people during church processions.

THE PAINTING OF ICONS
Icons are painted according to specific guidelines and rules called canons, by iconographers, or icon-writers, who have studied the canons and carry out their work in a prayerful manner. The iconic style came about naturally, as a result of the many small contributions of people, often anonymous, who led holy lives completely centered on God, throughout the history of the Church. The icon reflects these people’s intuitive sense for expressing the Truth of the Church, as well as their conscious consideration of Church teachings. In this way, the icon is not an arbitrary picture painted according to the individual imagination of a single artist. Rather, the subject, pattern, and execution of an icon all draw on the collective experience of the Church, an experience of two thousand years.

BEYOND ARTISTIC DECORATION
The role of the icon in the Church is beyond that of simple decoration. The icon is a sacred object directly connected to the actual Presence of God, which it bears within the images of the saints depicted on it. The completed icon is ceremonially blessed by the priest, and the symbolic image on the icon is united with its heavenly prototype. Thus the image is not an illusion, but shares in the reality of what or whom it represents. As such, the icon is an integral, living part of the Church no less than the people of the church are, and cannot be removed as easily as an optional decoration.

How is the icon connected to a living presence inside it, and not a mere painting? To help understand, we can give an example of a window through which we see a person outdoors: the image of the person we see through the window is not a picture painted on the surface of the glass of the window by our imagination; it is the very person standing outside. The image we see is inseparable from that person. In the same way, and even more, the image we see on an icon is a direct link to the holy person whom it represents. This is partially because the "glass" of the icon has been refined by the long tradition of the Church, and does not distort the image.

A WINDOW INTO HEAVEN
Christ said, "My Kingdom is not of this world." Icons are the windows from our physical world into that Kingdom, which is invisible to physical eyes. The images of the holy persons we see on icons are not portraits of those people from the time when they lived on earth. Rather, they are the images of those people as they now and forever exist on the other side of the window which is the icon. The saint depicted on an icon is standing within that invisible Heavenly Kingdom and is made visible through the icon to us who are still on this side. The human form with which the icon presents the beholder is an image of holiness, spiritual strength, and restored beauty. It is an example of the state which the believer must attain to be able to meet God face to face.

In the church, the iconostasis, which is the partition between the altar and nave, is a screen of icons. We can visualize these large icons as windows into the altar. We view the iconostasis not as a wall, but as a screen. On it, that which is invisible to physical eyes during church services (the mystical action of the Holy Spirit), is made visible. This is valuable, because to truly be aware of what is happening during the service requires great concentration and faith. The icon screen helps the believer focus by "translating" the liturgical service into a language easily understood by all people: the language of image.
From the Prosopon School of Iconology
ICON WORKSHOP 2009

First time student's icon (in process)
First time student's icon (in process)
First time student's icon (in process)
PAST Icon Painting Workshop - JULY 2009

Icon Painting Workshop
PROSOPON SCHOOL OF ICONOLOGY

Santa Fe
Instructor: Fr. Mefodii

You may contact us now for additional information regarding the 2010 workshop.

Contact Elizabeth Bezzerides
505-660-9113
ebezzerides@gmail.com
Icon Workshop Photos

Student receiving individual assitance
Student receiving individual assitance
Student receiving individual assitance
Workshop class session
Workshop class session
Workshop class session
Icon Workshop Photos
Photos of workshop class in session (click to enlarge).
Icon Workshop - Icon and Workshop Lecture

Beginning Student Icon Archangel Michael
Beginning Student Icon Archangel Michael
Beginning Student Icon Archangel Michael
Icon Workshop Lecture
Icon Workshop Lecture
Icon Workshop Lecture
Saint Dimitri of Rostov Orthodox Church
Los Alamos, New Mexico
www.stdimitri.org
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